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How is solubility different from dissolution? And how are they both different from solvation?

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Solvation [...] is the process of attraction and association of molecules of a solvent with molecules or ions of a solute. As ions dissolve in a solvent they spread out and become surrounded by solvent molecules. [...]

Dissolution is a kinetic process, and is quantified by its rate. Solubility quantifies the dynamic equilibrium state achieved when the rate of dissolution equals the rate of precipitation.

Quote from Wikipedia.

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Solubility is a chemical property referring to the ability of a given substance, the solute, to dissolve in a solvent. Dissolution, or solvation, is the process by which a solute interacts with and becomes dissolved in a solvent due to an increase in stability.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is in principle the same as Tschoppi already stated. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Mar 1 '16 at 4:56
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Solubility is maximum amount of solute that will dissolve in a given solvent at a given temperature to form saturated solution. Dissociation is a more kinetic process which depend on lattice and hydration energy.

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• Dissolution is the process where a solute dissolves in a solvent to form a solution, whereas solubility is the outcome of dissolution.

• Solubility is a thermodynamic entity whereas dissolution is kinetic.

• Solubility is measured in mol/kg and dissolution is measured in mol/s

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solubility:

  • the capacity of solute to be dissolved in a given amount of solvent (how many moles of solute are dissolved)
  • solutes solubility is always questioned
  • it is a thermodynamic process
  • its unit is mol/kg

dissolution:

  • rate of solute dissolving in a solution (how fast the solute dissolves)
  • solute is always soluble
  • it is a kinetic process
  • its unit is mol/sec
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