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Is it because the new substance formed might be acidic/basic ? The internet defines this point as when the number of moles of the acid equals the number of moles of the base. But if we have for example 1 mole of NaOH and 1 mole of H2SO4 (both in dilute solutions) mixed together, the resulting solution will still be acidic because 1 mole of H2SO4 releases 2 moles of H+ right ? So we will have an extra mole of H+ which will make the resulting mixture acidic. So is this still the equivalence point even though it isnt really equal (bcz we have 1 extra mole of H+) or is it 1 mole of NaOH + half a mole of H2SO4 ?

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marked as duplicate by Todd Minehardt, airhuff, Pritt Balagopal, Mithoron, M.A.R. ಠ_ಠ Jul 17 '17 at 13:43

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The equivalence point is defined as when you have an equal amount of acid and base. It you have a strong acid and a strong base, the pH at the equivalence point should be pretty close to 7, but if you have a weak acid or a weak base involved, there is not reason why the equivalence point should be at pH 7. You would have a conjugate base or acid that is reasonably basic or acidic at the equivalence point.

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