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This question already has an answer here:

Okay, this will be tricky to explain. But, this is a question that i have been wondering about in quite a long time, okay lets get started, Molecules moves faster in higher temperatures and there will be more space between the molecules than in cooler temperatures, right? i wonder what is between the molecules? in pure water to an example, there should be only oxygen and hydrogen. But, what is between the H2O molecules? it got to be something, right?

I hope you guys can understand my question, my english is not the best and i am no expert in chemistry. :)

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marked as duplicate by Mithoron, Buttonwood, Pritt Balagopal, Jon Custer, paracetamol Jul 5 '17 at 5:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Just because they move faster doesn't mean there's more space between them. Here's why:

We need to look at several important things in this case: how many molecules, what's the temperature and what's the space they are in. For this example it is most easy to understand if we say we got the same space and the same amount of molecules, we just want to change the temperature.

If we got 1000 molecules (to make the math easy) in a liter (=1000 mL) then in average each molecule has free space around it of 1 mL. It doesn't matter how fast the molecules move, there are always 1000 molecules in 1000 mL so on average each molecules does always have 1 mL of space.

And in addition: between molecules is just nothing.

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