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Why does iodine exhibit metallic properties at room temperature although being a non-metal? Are there any similar elements like this?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Jan, Jon Custer, ringo, Wildcat, Philipp Oct 5 '16 at 20:36

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't think Iodine is a typically regarded as a metalloid -- see for example en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metalloid Let us all know if there is a contrary reference as iodine is certainly an interesting element L F Ludwig $\endgroup$ – user20746 Sep 9 '15 at 2:50
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Iodine is a metalloid. Metalloid elements have one or more allotropes with properties intermediate between those of a metal and a nonmetal.

Metals are lustrous, ductile, and conductive of heat and electricity.

Nonmetals are matte, brittle, and insulators.

Metalloids may be semiconductors, like silicon, germanium, arsenic, and carbon (graphite). They may be lustrous, but brittle, like iodine and tellurium.

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    $\begingroup$ But, according to Wikipedia, iodine is a non-metal in lieu of a metalloid? $\endgroup$ – Zafer Cesur Jan 16 '14 at 21:24
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    $\begingroup$ From that same Wikipedia article: There is no standard definition of a metalloid, nor is there agreement as to which elements are appropriately classified as such. I classify iodine as a metalloid. My metalloid list also included carbon and phosphrous, but not aluminum. $\endgroup$ – Ben Norris Jan 16 '14 at 22:47
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    $\begingroup$ Fair enough then. $\endgroup$ – Zafer Cesur Jan 16 '14 at 22:52
  • $\begingroup$ How is iodine a metalloid? Is it not a halogen? $\endgroup$ – user3932000 Jan 2 '17 at 23:22
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    $\begingroup$ @user3932000 - "Halogen" is the name of the group - the column on the periodic table. "Metalloid", like "metal" and "nonmetal" is a classification of elements based on similar properties. Iodine may be a metalloid and a halogen. Chlorine is a nonmetal and a halogen. Tellurium is a chalcogen (name of the oxygen group) and a metalloid. $\endgroup$ – Ben Norris Jan 3 '17 at 11:25
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All such trends are attributed to periodicity in properties Generally, going down a group in periodic table metallic character increases which is attributed to the dominance of addition of new principal quantum number over increasing nuclear charge.This results in increasing size of atoms which in turn results in lowering of ionization enthalpy (a parameter that may be used to judge upon metallic nature:lower the ionisation enthalpy,higher the metallic nature).Since ionistation enthapy is inversely proportional to size,hence it decreases down a Group.

That's why in Halogen family Iodine possess metallic character to some extent. However these terms become relative if we universalize them.For example there are compounds of Iodine like

Fluorides Iodine fluoride: IF Iodine trifluoride: IF3 Iodine pentafluoride: IF5 Iodine heptafluoride: IF7

Chlorides Iodine chloride: ICl Diiodine hexachloride: [ICl3]2

where Iodine shows metallic character.At the same time we too have

NaI,KI etc. where it acts as a non metal.Hence it become more logical to say it to be a metalloid.(Since also across a Period metallic character decreases.So the two effects viz General increase in metallic character down a group and decrease in it across a period compensate. enter image description here

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Iodine is in fact a metalloid and not a non-metal, metalloids exhibit the properties of both metals and nonmetals partially, so that is the reason for iodines both metallic and non-metallic properties.Another example is silicon.

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