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I have a compound that consists of a metal ion chelated by a linear organic structure with assorted moieties in aqueous medium. I'd like to dehydrate this mixture fully to get solid product, but heating is out of question due to unwanted repercussions on aforementioned "assorted moieties". If I lyophilize the compound, will it remain chelated or is there a risk of the metal ion unbinding?


I lyophilized my sample and redissolved a portion of it and confirmed chelation by verifying the presence of the absorption peak of the Lanthanide I was chelating and using Beer's Law.

Thanks for your help.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't think this can be answered with the amount of information provided. $\endgroup$ – Zhe Jun 5 '17 at 20:13
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Lyophilization is regarded safer as normal drying because it is performed at considerably lower temperature; however in order to achieve this, you have to lower the pressure above the condensed phase, too. Naturally volatile compounds (including some organic compounds solid at room temperature) may sublime under these conditions, too; which may be hold for hours, even days to remove the water gradually. This simultaneous process may lower the yield of isolated product.

Other light organic molecules (like methanol, ethanol, THF) equally may leave the vessel, too. The complexation may be affected if leaving molecules were involved as part of the no-further specified chelate, too.

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This can easily be done by using rotary evaporator, water can be removed if you have strong rotary pump from the metal complex. The chemistry of metal complex would not be disturbed and metal will remain intact with your chelator. Change in the pH or changing the condition may would decrease the stability of your metal complex.

If you don't have access to rotary evaporator having strong pump, Simply freeze dry your sample using dry ice and then use freeze dryer to remove water from sample and let it dry overnight.

Lyophilization is much safer technique and mostly used to remove water from heat sensitive organic compounds.

Sincerely ,

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