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Aldrich says that these two names are synonyms of one another. Does anyone know the etymology of arabinohexose used in this context?

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Actually arabinohexose got its name from the family of six carbon membered mono saccharide(i.e. aldohexose) and the first name arabinose is taken from the another popular name i.e. gum arabica because it was first extracted from it!

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  • $\begingroup$ But if you look at the nomenclature of aldoses en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monosaccharide_nomenclature arabinose has five carbons en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabinose and glucose has six. Do you have a reference for your statement "[a]ctually arabinohexose got its name from ..." $\endgroup$ Jun 1, 2017 at 12:38
  • $\begingroup$ In the statement you've replied you wrote about arabinose and actually you were asking for arabinohexose $\endgroup$ Jun 1, 2017 at 12:52
  • $\begingroup$ OK. Can you give me the link for arabinohexose please? $\endgroup$ Jun 1, 2017 at 13:02
  • $\begingroup$ Sir, actually I have not copied it from somewhere rather i'd combined contents from internet and my knowledge of etymology. That's why I can't give you a exact link. I hope you understand! $\endgroup$ Jun 1, 2017 at 15:40
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D-glucose (a hexose) is a C6, normal (straight) chain aldehyde (in its non-cyclized form) bearing a hydroxyl group at each carbon (C2-C6) in a unique spatial arrangement at C2-C5. 2-Deoxyglucose is missing the hydroxyl group at C2. D-Arabinose is a pentose (C5) that has the same absolute configuration at C2-C4 as 2-deoxyglucose does at C3-C5. The prefix arabino refers to the configurations in 2-deoxyglucose. "Hex" means six carbons. "Ose" is the suffix for a sugar.

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