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I put 9% acetic acid to 60% potassium hydroxide solution to neutralize it and was hoping to see some fizzing, but didn't see any indication of them reacting. Why is that?

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    $\begingroup$ People often neutralise acetic acid with a weak base such as sodium hydrogen carbonate, which liberates carbon dioxide gas as the reaction proceeds in addition to the other neutralisation products. $\endgroup$ – NotEvans. May 20 '17 at 14:44
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    $\begingroup$ The reaction for this would be: $$\ce{CH3COOH + KOH -> CH3COO^{-}K+ + H2O}$$ There are no gaseous products, so you can't really expect any fizzing. $\endgroup$ – Pritt Balagopal May 20 '17 at 14:52
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As stated in Pritt's comment, the reaction you are performing is:

$$\ce{CH3COOH + KOH -> CH3COO^−K+ + H2O}$$

Note that none of the products are gases, so there is no effervescence (fizzing). If you want a neutralization reaction that will effervesce, then you need to form a gas. A simple candidate for this would be sodium bicarbonate (baking soda), which would give the following reaction:

$$\ce{CH3COOH + NaHCO3 -> CH3COO^−Na+ + H2O + CO2 ^}$$

With this we are forming $\ce{CO2}$ gas, which will cause the solution to effervesce. Note that this is likely to be stinky and messy: a good experiment to perform outdoors.

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Acetic acid is a too weak acid to neutralise KOH.

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