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When reducing an oxide with carbon what would be the product? I think it would produce $\ce{CO2}$ and then the $\ce{CO2}$ would react with $\ce{C}$ to give some amount of $\ce{CO}$. For example:

$$\ce{2CuO + C -> 2Cu + CO2}$$

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  • $\begingroup$ You can see ellingham diagram which precisely tells what would be formed under what conditions. $\endgroup$ – Archis Welankar May 5 '17 at 12:28
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If the conditions of the reaction (depending on temperature, pressure and any other gases present) are such that you are producing $\ce{CO2}$, then $\ce{CuO}$ should readily oxidize any $\ce{CO}$ that gets produced all the way to $\ce{CO2}$.

The main reaction should be as you said:

$$\ce{2CuO + C -> 2Cu + CO2}$$

and if you have any formation of $\ce{CO}$, it will be oxidized as:

$$\ce{CuO + CO -> Cu + CO2}$$

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It depends a lot on the reaction conditions. You might have heard of extraction of iron from ore, which involves using carbon to reduce it. In that process $\ce{CO}$ is formed, while in your example of copper, $\ce{CO2}$ is formed. It depends on the extent to which it gets oxidized.

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