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What compound is this please? A painkiller?

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    $\begingroup$ Please try to include full details when asking a question, otherwise it may sound you just want to get done with your homework. Include details that will be beneficial to other users as well. $\endgroup$ – xavier_fakerat Apr 29 '17 at 15:27
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It is diclofenac, which is described there as "applied to reduce inflammation and as an analgesic reducing pain in certain conditions".

By drawing the structure in emolecules (search mask here), I selected the entry as the free acid (and not the sodium salt, for example). A click on "LSKB" below the structure representation linked to the next database in which the restraint "where to find" was lessened to "chemicals in literature". Eventually I was guided towards this page, which a first entry name not following systematic nomenclature; an often seen pattern for pharmaceutical products:

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To round the picture, if looking for physical chemical data, I would repeat the query, then including its salts (like the sodium salt).

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  • $\begingroup$ Ver impressive research @Buttonwood, pretty useful software $\endgroup$ – xavier_fakerat Apr 29 '17 at 15:23
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    $\begingroup$ @xavier_fakerat Information aims for propagation, and sharing among the interested people; in my perception, ChemSE surely is among these avenues. $\endgroup$ – Buttonwood Apr 29 '17 at 15:33
  • $\begingroup$ Indeed! That's very true. $\endgroup$ – xavier_fakerat Apr 29 '17 at 15:39
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    $\begingroup$ This is also a good structure search engine that works in android and iphones as well:organic-chemistry.org/chemicals/structuresearch.htm $\endgroup$ – Pritt says Reinstate Monica Apr 30 '17 at 2:52

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