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Mendeleev's recognition of the periodicity of atomic trends was a milestone of human understanding, the detection of a pattern in what had appeared to be chaotic data. I think the significance and sheer beauty of these patterns is lost on many people (layfolk and students alike). I am wondering whether anyone knows of a coffee-table book or some other collection of images that evoke the predicted nature of atomic properties such as atomic radius, ionization energy, melting point, etc. Sure, the information is available via interactive software, but I'm looking for something more aesthetic... if it exists yet.

Particularly, my search is provoked by this striking arrangement of oxidation state information. Were it to be cleaned up a bit, it would make a beautiful poster.

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I have an entire chapter regarding periodicity in my textbook. Have a look at the images in it:

Atomic Radius:

enter image description here

enter image description here

Ionization Enthalpies: enter image description here enter image description here

A summary of periodic trends:

enter image description here

These are the pictures in my textbook. As a bonus, I'll even add a few examples from our day-to-day life:

Alkali Metals: Lithium:

enter image description here

Sodium:

enter image description here

Potassium:

enter image description here

Rubidium: (its enclosed in glass because it spontaneously combusts in air)

enter image description here

Cesium:

enter image description here

You can notice that properties of elements periodically repeat. All the alkali metals have silvery appearance, with cesium having a little bit of yellow-golden in it. They are soft, and have exceptionally high reactivity.

Halogens:

Fluorine:

enter image description here

Chlorine:

enter image description here

Bromine:

enter image description here

Iodine:

enter image description here

You can see that all the halogens are quite colored, and most have low melting and boiling points. Thats why fluorine and chlorine are gases, while bromine is a liquid with thick vapors. Iodine, however is a solid due to higher attractions due to increased molecular mass. All the halogens are quite reactive, with fluorine and chlorine violently so.

Transition Metals (a few examples):

Iron:

enter image description here

Cobalt:

enter image description here

Nickel:

enter image description here

Chromium:

enter image description here

You can see how the transition metals are quite similar to each other. They are lustrous in appearance, are quite hard, and also display quite a few catalytic properties. For example, iron is used in the manufacture of ammonia, nickel is used to hydrogenate vegetables oils, palladium is used in catalytic converters, et cetera.

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  • $\begingroup$ Added Halogens :) $\endgroup$ – Pritt Balagopal Apr 25 '17 at 15:51
  • $\begingroup$ Added Transition Elements! $\endgroup$ – Pritt Balagopal Apr 26 '17 at 14:38
  • $\begingroup$ Congratulations on your 1k rep. Keep contributing to the site like this. $\endgroup$ – Nilay Ghosh Apr 26 '17 at 15:03
  • $\begingroup$ @NilayGhosh Thank you. Definitely StackExchange and me won't be leaving each other for a while. $\endgroup$ – Pritt Balagopal Apr 26 '17 at 15:14

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