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I am currently in a dilemma where I need to have pure Iron (III) nitrate, but I have Iron (III) nitrate 9 hydrate in order to do a lab experiment where I investigate voltaic cell. I am pretty sure the hydrate will mess up the results, so I want to remove the hydrate to give $\ce{Fe(NO3)3}$. Is there any way for me to do this?

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    $\begingroup$ What kind of voltaic cell would require an anhydrous salt? I thought they are mostly about water solutions. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Apr 20 '17 at 18:54
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    $\begingroup$ Out of curiosity, is your voltaic cell going to be a wet cell? If so, account for the water. Even many "dry" cells have an electrolyte paste. $\endgroup$ – Ben Norris Apr 20 '17 at 18:55
  • $\begingroup$ @BenNorris It is! What do you mean by accounting the water? Should I take note of the change in water levels? $\endgroup$ – idk wat else Apr 20 '17 at 19:26
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You just need to heat the sample.Water of Crystallization

For the ferric nitrate I recommend adjusting the temperate at 110$^\circ$C see wikipedia page

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  • $\begingroup$ I can't find anything on that Wikipedia page indicating that you could obtain the anhydrous material by heating to 110C. I did see that the nonahydrate boils at 125C. $\endgroup$ – airhuff Apr 21 '17 at 2:19
  • $\begingroup$ True, boiling of nonahydrate means that it is losing water, but it is never stated that it loses all water, or that it doesn't hydrolyze in the process. More importantly, when the OP is going to shoot himself in the leg, it is a good practice not to help them with that, even if that's what the question literally asks for. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Apr 21 '17 at 8:01
  • $\begingroup$ In the Water of Crystallization page it states that it loses water. I suggest that you do a TGA or DSC beforehand. This will identify how much of the water is lost during heating and at what temperature $\endgroup$ – Mahmoud Agha Apr 21 '17 at 11:53

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