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I am trying to measure the absorbance of a solution at 882 nm, but this seems to be beyond the range of many UV-Vis spectrometers. Is this a job for the IR spectroscopy, or something else? I do not have much experience with IR spectroscopy.

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No this is not a job for an IR machine. It all depends on the machine you are using, but provided the monochromators will extend that far all that may be necessary is to change the detector for one that is more red sensitive. If your machine will not do the job, and if its a one-off type of measurement try to get time on another machine somewhere else. If this is not possible or you need to measure many samples over a long period you may need to experiment by using a lamp , interference filters and a detector etc and make your own machine to measure transmittance.

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To second @porphyrin, this is still requesting UV-Vis spetroscopy. Perhaps a group specialized in analytical chemistry, or physicists active in material science either i) may provide you access to UV-Vis spectrometers like the Lambda900 by Perkin Elmer (example) or a Cary / Agilent (example), or ii) may record the data for you.

Depending on the solvent deployed and the question addressed by the analysis, it is not this uncommon to characterize newly prepared materials by UV-Vis spectroscopy in a range of 200 or 250 nm to 1000 nm; because frequently you do not want to restrain your analysis in the determination of the maximal $\varepsilon$, but to record the absorption band completely. In addition, such an extended data set may be helpful to prepare / compare further characterisations, like ellipsometry, for example. If you are starting to record UV-Vis data on your own, I suggest consultation of a primer like this as a helpful reference.

Routine IR spectra are recorded in a different range of wavelengths, typically expressed in wavenumbers, of 4000 1/cm (about 2500 nm) to 550 1/cm (about 18200 nm). There may be some overlap if, for example, a polymer coating is characterised firstly with a research UV-Vis spectrometer mentioned earlier in principle capable to collect data up to 3000 nm, and subsequently with an IR spectrometer. This however requests some additional preparation of the data collection.

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