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I want to do some spectrometry experiments with glow in the dark paints. The red paints I've read product details for all seem to require a uv light to charge. Are there any red glow in the dark paints that can be charged with visible light?

I was also wondering why most red phosphorescent pigments don't have the ability to glow as long as green pigments.

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean fluorescent or phosphorescent? $\endgroup$ – chipbuster Nov 27 '13 at 18:08
  • $\begingroup$ Oops, I meant phosphorescent. Thanks for clarifying. $\endgroup$ – Nathan Nov 27 '13 at 21:22
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The wikipedia page on Phosphoresence has a red pigment. Calcium Sulfide. I can imagine that the lower energy (higher wavelength, lower energy) is more stable because the triplet is not as high in state energy as lower wavelength emitters. Because of the stability the time to emit is longer and the intensity lower.

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