0
$\begingroup$

Not a chemist but looking for an answer I can understand.

Electronic cigarettes use propylene glycol and/or vegetable glycerin as a base liquid. This is heated and vaporized at a low temperature (my e-cig is 7 watt). When exhaled the VG/PG absorbs water from the air producing the visible vapour cloud.

Assuming standard temperature ($\pu{20^\circ C}$) and humidity ($\pu{50\%}$), what ratio (or percentage) of the visible cloud is water?

It's not that I can't find an answer to this, just can't find an answer I believe. Most based on rumor and warm fuzzy feelings of what people want to believe.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

The short answer to this is that there is no single answer to this problem as the vapor composition that is produced by any given atomizer is dependant upon a large number of components. To name a few:

Given all of these factors, and the large number that I am sure that I am missing, there is simply too many confounding variables to be able to give a straight answer to your question without directly measuring the concentration - not that I would know how you would make such a measurement.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Disclosure: I'm not a chemist.

First off you can't be sure what temperatures your atomizer reaches purely by wattage because it depends on coil resistance, material and if you run your vaporizer in TC mode (I assume you do not have that option available).

Humidity will only have a visual impact on cloud density after you exhale. Depending on atmospheric humidity glycerin molecules will effectively bond with water in the air. The more humidity it is, the more water will be picked up.

The ratio of glycerin to water in the cloud forming then will depend on: - temperature - humidity - volume of air in which the cloud is expanding

What I'm more interested in is if this contributes to atomizers popping (especially open air ones like RDA's). Say I leave it standing on my desk overnight soaked in juice. What will be the liquid water % be then.

Also how does this effect contribute to nicotine neutralisation? I red that it gets broken after contact with oxygen and I guess that it will get plenty of it while floating in an areosol particle.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.