0
$\begingroup$

The answer is A, but how is that? I know B is an intermediate, so that after short time it will be bigger than C, but what does "thermodynamic control" and "kinetic control" mean?

https://i.stack.imgur.com/7yoMM.png

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Initially no B and C exist. At short times as $k_1 > k_2$ production of B is favoured over C. (The initial amounts of B and C are so small that back reactions can be ignored wrt. forwards ones.) At long times equilibrium constants matter and as the equilibrium constant $K_2$ is greatest this is favoured to produce C over B.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

A kinetic product arises when the reaction is not supplied any additional conditions..therby proceeds through a stable intermediate. A thermodynamically controlled reaction is one where you supply heat or any such necessary condition to get a specific product ( mostly the more substituted one...ie saydseff products)...thus goes for a stable product even if a not so stable intermediate forms in the mechanism. I guess thats about it

P.S:Saydseff for organic reactions..idk what you call it in inorganic chemistry

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.