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if you leave mercury chloride (ii) exposed to air in a room does it evaporate to any significant level which can cause toxicity?

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According to this 1911 Journal of the American Chemical Society article (Johnson, F. M. G, JACS 1911, 33, 777), the vapor pressure of $\ce{HgCl2}$ is 3 mmHg at 152 degrees Celsius. Since the article is behind a paywall, I will reproduce the data below:

$$\begin{array}{|c|c|} \hline T/ \mathrm{^\circ C} & P/ \mathrm{mmHg} \\ \hline 152 & 3\\ 195 & 20 \\ 231 & 82 \\ 256 & 198\\ 262 & 237 \\ 275 & 325\\ 278 & 421 \\ 283 & 481\\ 302 & 754\\ \hline \end{array}$$

The authors did not report values for lower temperatures since their method focused on setting a pressure in the system and then measuring the temperature of sublimation/boiling point. However, using the data and some help from the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship, an estimate for the room temperature vapor pressure is $2.4\times 10^{-4}\ \mathrm{mmHg}$, which assuming you are at 1 atm, is 0.32 parts per million when the atmosphere is saturated. Consult a safety data sheet or other source for toxicity considerations at that exposure level.

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