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In school I learned of the "possible hazardity of artificial sweeteners." But that was some time ago, now. I think that science should have caught up by now.

My question is as follows.

Which chemical properties in artifical sweeteners could be potentially cancerogenous?

(This is to say, if there exists cancerogenous properties in artificially made sweeteners from the start).

Please enlighten me.

Examples of sweeteners:

enter image description here Fig 1 Acesulfame Potassium

enter image description here

Fig 2 Aspartame

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  • $\begingroup$ Isn't that kind of common knowledge -> just look up wikipedia, for example en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspartame#Cancer for aspartame and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acesulfame_potassium#Safety I don't see a good reason to just repeat that here. $\endgroup$ – logical x 2 Feb 26 '17 at 18:12
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    $\begingroup$ From the first look at it, at least acesulfame seems quite reactive. The structure kind of reminds me of 1,3-propanesultone, a known teratogene. $\endgroup$ – logical x 2 Feb 26 '17 at 18:14
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    $\begingroup$ You assume hazards exist. They don't or we would have noticed by now. Lots of people have been using artificial sweeteners for years and no good studies have shown measurable problems. Traditional sugar (sucrose, glucose or fructose) is associated with many diseases (and it makes you fat which itself is a cancer risk). $\endgroup$ – matt_black Feb 28 '17 at 13:51
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From the NHS website in the UK: The US National Cancer Institute conducted a study of nearly half a million people, comparing those who consumed drinks containing aspartame with those who did not. Results of the study found aspartame did not increase the risk of leukaemia, lymphoma or brain cancer." Also: In 2013 the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) conducted a comprehensive review of the evidence (there is a pdf on the website) and concluded that aspartame was safe for human consumption, including pregnant women and children. Cancer Research UK also have stated that artificial sweeteners are safe. Rigorous testing is carried out before a sweetener can be approved for use in the EU.
So, no evidence of cancer in humans. Rats, maybe. Humans no.

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