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I have a solution which probably contains a phospholipid (phosphatydylcholine), I would like to know if there is an easy method to show the presence of the phospholipid.

I came across TLC, but I couldn't perform it since it's too difficult and expensive to buy chloroform. So, If you guys know an easy method to show the presence of phospholipids please reply.

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Your question kind of asks two different things:

1) Whether there is an easy method to show the presence of hosphatydylcholine
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2) Whether there is an easy method to show the presence of phospholipids in general.

My first comment is that if TLC with chloroform is too expensive, then you are probably out of luck. This is not a simple thing to do, particulary the specific analysis of a single particular phospholipid in the presence of others. This Wikipedia article gives some insight on this:

There are no simple methods available for analysis of phospholipids since the close range of polarity between different phospholipid species makes detection difficult. Oil chemists often use spectroscopy to determine total Phosphorus abundance and then calculate approximate mass of phospholipids based on molecular weight of expected fatty acid species. Modern lipid profiling employs more absolute methods of analysis, with nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), particularly $\ce{{^{31}P}}$-NMR, while HPLC-ELSD provides relative values.

Unfortunately, these methods are going to be orders of magnitude more expensive to do yourself, as compared to TLC, though outsourcing may or may not be a viable alternative in your case.

The same article discusses a phospholipid characterization technique based on refractive index measurements that, again, may or may not be a viable type of analysis for your specific use case.

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