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Metals in low Oxidation states are usually reducing agents. Is there any example of a metal in zero Oxidation state acting as an oxidizing agent.

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As with pretty much every "is there ______?" in chemistry, the answer is yes, there is.

Of course, using the pure metal itself as an oxidising agent would be really tough. However, if you use certain tricks to stabilise the negative oxidation state, it is possible. For example, π-acceptor ligands such as $\ce{CO}$ withdraw electron density from the metal. So, $\ce{M[(CO)_n]^m-}$ complexes are stable for certain choices of $\ce{M}$, $n$, and $m$. For more details see: 18 Electron Rule For Determining the Stability of Transition Metal Complexes

Consider $\ce{[V(CO)6]}$, a 17-electron complex. It would be quite happy to accept another electron to become $[\ce{V(CO)6}]^-$. This reduction can be achieved with sodium metal. So, here vanadium(0) is acting as an oxidising agent; it is itself reduced to vanadium(−1).

These examples are not incredibly common, but it can happen.

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If metal is in 0 oxidation state would get oxidized, then it would have to achieve a negative oxidation state since it would have to itself get reduced. Since it is a metal, it would have a really low reduction potential. If the reducing agent has a really high reduction potential, then I think it might be possible ( you will have to check the reduction potential values for that )

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