1
$\begingroup$

So somebody told me that iron metal (zero charge) cannot exist at all when $\ce{H2O}$ is present because it will all turn into rust.
How is this possible? Isn't there some sort of equilibrium?
Does it have to do with the pH/pE? And if iron really can't exist, then what happens if I put an excess of iron into the water?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I think you mean organometallic Fe(0) (i.e. coordinated single atom), and not bulk metal. Can clarify this? $\endgroup$ – Greg May 12 '15 at 3:55
1
$\begingroup$

Iron metal can exist in presence of water. As you stated, important point is the $\ce{Fe^0 -> Fe^3+}$ reaction. Water is not an oxidizing agent, therefore is not capable of inducing this process.

To create rust, you need also oxygen, or as you noted, electrochemical potential.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.