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What do most labs use to wash their glasswares? I usually use plain clothes detergent. But, I'm starting to suspect that there are residual detergent even though I've brushed the glassware; rinsed it until there is no slipperi-ness and then after that, rinsing it in cold water again.

Is there anything wrong with this?

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  • $\begingroup$ The usual brand of detergent is T!de Original. $\endgroup$ – Dehbop Feb 5 '17 at 9:06
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    $\begingroup$ Why cold instead of hot water rinse? $\endgroup$ – airhuff Feb 5 '17 at 9:17
  • $\begingroup$ Coz hot water is more likely to have more copper oxides with it (or whatever hot water pipes in your part of the world is made out of). $\endgroup$ – Dehbop Feb 5 '17 at 9:34
  • $\begingroup$ Also for final rinsing, might as well use the less energy intensive cold one. $\endgroup$ – Dehbop Feb 5 '17 at 9:35
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    $\begingroup$ Impossible to answer. What are you using your glassware for? How perfectly clean do you need them? Are detergents a problem? Not using DI water for the final rinse leaves carbonate stains on the glass, which collect more dirt. Unless you wipe the glassware dry, but that could spread more contamination. Etc. $\endgroup$ – Karl Feb 5 '17 at 14:18
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Hygiene procedures are application specific. For example, a metals lab will acid wash glassware, while an organics lab will solvent wash glassware. Perform the most economical hygiene that suits your purpose. If residual detergent could affect your experiment/analysis, it's time to change your wash procedure, regardless if there is a residual after washing. However, if there is no affect on your application, you're doing fine.

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    $\begingroup$ Not "hygiene procedures" but "contamination procedures." You should never eat/cook in glassware used for chemistry experiments. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Feb 5 '17 at 16:53
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    $\begingroup$ wow. that is a great distinction. i had always errantly lumped glassware and handling under chemical hygiene, but hygiene does specifically referred to protection of person. safety and nomenclature are two of my favorite things. thanks! $\endgroup$ – user40263 Feb 5 '17 at 17:28

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