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I am trying to create instant boiling water using a chemical of sorts, so that it can be consumed by a human. For example; someone could make tea without a kettle or any available water heating systems.

It must be completely safe and if possible, leave no bad tasting remains. Preferably, the chemicals used would have to be easily accessible and stable in its bought state.

I am in high school and just want to do a cool science experiment. I guess this could have endless potential applications. I am also open to other ideas, like making a disposable bottle, that when you twisted the lid, the water would heat up as the chemicals dropped down or the bottle itself heated up. Just any way of doing it would be awesome.

I saw this page but is wasn't consumable ideas:

Can you heat water with additives?

Thanks, Charles

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    $\begingroup$ You mean you want an idea that would surely make you an instant billionaire? Think again. ;-) $\endgroup$
    – Karl
    Feb 5, 2017 at 14:32
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    $\begingroup$ google.com/search?q=self+heating+coffee $\endgroup$
    – Karl
    Feb 5, 2017 at 14:43
  • $\begingroup$ It would work,if the impurities have a lower boiling point than water,which I can tell you almost certainly are not. $\endgroup$ Jun 3 at 17:49

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Adding something to water that heats it to 100°C and leaves only water is of course nonsense.

A self-heating cup is easy: You take a double-walled beaker, fill the space between with two compounds that react with great heat but no gas formation, separated by an extra wall with a valve.

Google the self-cooling beer keg. It works very similar, only it gets hot outside, not inside.

Or just google "self-heating coffe cup".

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As the comment above suggests, if there was an obvious way to do this it would already be making someone wealthy.

Self heating cans (and gloves) are seen where an exothermic chemical reaction or heat of solution is used to thermally warm food or gloves. The most common application of this method are 'flameless ration heaters' used to heat MRE (military rations).

Typically the ration heater employs an oxidation-reduction reaction e.g. a small amount of water is added to finely powdered magnesium metal, alloyed with a small amount of iron, and table salt. This forms an electrolyte and because the magnesium and iron are in contact it is analogous to many short circuited batteries. The boiling point of water is quickly reached as the reaction proceeds.

Note that the exothermic chemicals are physically isolated from the food being heated. A flameless ration heater might raise the temperature of a 230g meal, 38°C in 10 minutes.

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Long shot but if you can engineer a strong enough metal container and isolate the expanding gas' cooling effect from the system, you can maybe just maybe mix HN3 and nitrous acid. Byproducts are a lot of gas that should escape the system vessel (thus cooling it so big fail unless you can shield your system from the cooling effect) and FDA approved N2O and water. You will need explosives license to ship the product but hey you said could it be done and I am pretty sure it can't be done but maybe it can be done. I dunno man water also takes too much energy to heat up and boil too so idk about all of it

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Don't let the others here discourage you from thinking big. Having said that, the problem with your scheme is that generally we want to avoid adding stuff to drinking water, in order to keep it pure (except in very small amounts, such as chlorination to disinfect it). And you'd need to add a lot of reacting substance to water to get it to boil. That's why all the existing schemes to heat up food and drinks using chemicals keep the chemicals isolated from the water.

You'd need substances that are in solid or liquid form, and that reacted exothermically without leaving anything in the water. I don't know of any.

The only thing I can think of is hydrogen and oxygen gas, which combine exothermically to produce water. So you'd need some sort of a very heavy-walled container that could store oxygen and hydrogen under very high pressures, and could slowly flow them into a third container to gradually produce water. This would be very expensive, and wildly impractical for consumer use. The same effect could be much more simply accomplished with a heating element and a battery.

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