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I'm looking for a set of data (ideally graphed) of $\ce{O2}$ density as a function of $T$ or $p$ (with constant $p$ or $T$, respectively).

The best I've found is this 1948 paper which provides an empirical model but (1) it's not as recent as I'd like and (2) I want solid experimental data, not empirical fits. One can calculate ideal-gas densities by $$\frac{pM}{RT}$$ but I'm looking for real values.

A recent empirical model would also be very useful!

Something like this, which is $\rho(T)$ for air: enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ I feel a tad foolish for pointing out that the graph is an empirical fit. So what do you really want? Experimental data so you can do your own fit or some empirical equation so that you can calculate any P and T curve that you desire? $\endgroup$
    – MaxW
    Feb 3, 2017 at 7:51
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    $\begingroup$ And it isn't like the folks in 1948 were incompetent - why does being 'recent' matter? $\endgroup$
    – Jon Custer
    Feb 3, 2017 at 14:06
  • $\begingroup$ @MaxW it includes data points, which I would be happy with. @ Jon better equipment, low and high T fit, etc. $\endgroup$
    – khaverim
    Feb 3, 2017 at 15:56
  • $\begingroup$ What T range, what P range? $\endgroup$
    – MaxW
    Feb 3, 2017 at 16:13
  • $\begingroup$ 0 -> supercritical, ideally $\endgroup$
    – khaverim
    Feb 3, 2017 at 16:40

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A colleague showed me a website that can render almost any thermodynamic quantity as a function of another for various substances: http://webbook.nist.gov/chemistry/fluid/.

Using NIST's software allowed me to get an isobar graph of $\rho (T)$ from 55K to 1000K (at 1.0atm).

enter image description here

And $\rho (P)$ from 0 - 800atm (at 273.15K): enter image description here

It even has an HTML data-point option (and downloadable tab-delimited form). Perfect! In the case of $\ce{O2}$ it uses data from papers in the '80s and '90s (experimental and (from the software) empirical)

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  • $\begingroup$ LOL - Can NIST be trusted or do they too now use "alternate facts"? $\endgroup$
    – MaxW
    Feb 3, 2017 at 22:53
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    $\begingroup$ Professionals use it for molecular model development so I'd say it's a reliable resource $\endgroup$
    – khaverim
    Feb 3, 2017 at 22:59

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