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I'm wondering which intermolecular forces will exist between carbon dioxide and water. Instinctively, I would expect there to be only dispersion forces between the 2 molecules, because carbon dioxide is non-polar due to its linear shape. However, even though carbon dioxide is non-polar, it still contains dipoles. I'm curious if its possible that these dipoles in carbon dioxide will allow it to form dipole-dipole forces (or even H-bonds) with water. Could the partially negative oxygen atomspotentially accept a H-bond from water, even if carbon dioxide is non-polar?

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According to the this PubChem data table for the physical and chemical properties of carbon dioxide, it contains two hydrogen bond sites (each of the oxygens). This largely accounts for the high solubility of $\ce{CO2}$ compared to that of non-hydrogen bonding compounds like methane, which has about $\mathrm{1/25^{th}}$ of the Henry's law solubility in water as does $\ce{CO2}$.

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