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What element used to be called Fb? It was supposedly found in a meteorite in Antarctica and I can't find any references of it.

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    $\begingroup$ To my knowledge, there is no element with the symbol Fb. There are however, some with b as the second letter of the element symbol, such as Rb, Pb, Sb, Tb, and Yb. $\endgroup$ – Klaus-Dieter Warzecha Jan 20 '17 at 6:56
  • $\begingroup$ I'm guessing a P looked like an F somewhere and that it contains lead...wild guess. Any idea at all of where you saw the reference? On-line, text book, sci-fi channel ;) $\endgroup$ – airhuff Jan 20 '17 at 7:02
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    $\begingroup$ boards.4chan.org/sci/thread/8615928 ? $\endgroup$ – Secret Jan 20 '17 at 7:14
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    $\begingroup$ @Secret that's very reassuring. Thanks for digging it up. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Jan 20 '17 at 8:15
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    $\begingroup$ Its a text-question in a book. Everything is made up... Its an exercise $\endgroup$ – Fl.pf. Jan 20 '17 at 10:15
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Given that Facebookium ($\ce{Fb}$) does not exist, it is most likely a typo/transfer error for the first character of the element symbol.

The possible choices are $\ce{Rb}$, $\ce{Pb}$, $\ce{Sb}$, $\ce{Tb}$, and $\ce{Yb}$.

Among these, lead ($\ce{Pb}$) is very likely to be the right one.

In fact, there is a publication in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 1973, 20, 391-394 where the authors note in the abstract

In the four meteorites Yamato (a), (b), (c) and (d) recently found in Antarctica, the trace elements W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, Th and U were determined by spark source mass spectrometry. The concentrations of these elements were also measured in the meteorites Orgueil (C1), Murray (C2), Allende (C3), Abee (E4), Allegan (H5), Mocs (L6) and Johnstown (Ah).

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