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Question 1:
You currently see two colors that are two similar (dark yellow and orange) in a flame test lab. And also you have a hard time differentiating the colors, what is an alternative to distinguish the two compounds?

My thoughts:
I thought that it was because if you use a wooden splint to dip it into the chemicals, you accidentally combust it causing the inaccuracy and also the source of the flame is blue making it hard to see, thus you use a metal wire and dip that and put it just so slightly on top of the flame to not mix the blue color of the butane flame and the flame that came with the chemicals on the wire. Also to use a digital spectrometer for more accuracy

Am i right about my answer?

Question2:
Let's say that you are using reusable metal loops instead of wooden splints, and you were doing two flame tests of the same chemical and you get different colors, what is the error and the reason?

My thoughts:
I was really confused, maybe because for one of them you placed it too far from the flame source and for the other you placed it too close to the flame source?

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... two colors that are two similar (dark yellow and orange) in a flame test ...

Do you know what the two compounds might be?

The yellow colour typically indicates sodium, the orange flame colour calcium.

In order to distinguish the two compounds, you have several options:

  1. Use a different method

    You can try to precipitate the calcium ions in the form of an insoluble salt, such as its oxalate.

  2. Refine your flame test

    View the flames though a piece of cobalt glass! This filters of the yellow flame colour typical for sodium. Note that the flame colours for the other metals will look different now!

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  • $\begingroup$ Isnt calcium of a brickish red colour? $\endgroup$ – Som V. Tambe Apr 11 at 1:29
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Question 1 You currently see two colors that are two similar (dark yellow and orange) in a flame test lab. And also you have a hard time differentiating the colors, what is an alternative to distinguish the two compounds?

Ideally, you would use a spectroscope to view the emission lines of the flame. These lines are unique to each element (and in fact each isotope) and your unknowns can be compared to the known emission spectra patterns of each element for a definitive answer.

let's say that you are using reusable metal loops instead of wooden splints, and you were doing two flame tests of the same chemical and you get different colors, what is the error and the reason?

Carbon (from the wood) does burn an orange color so this may confound flame test results especially when the colors are close to that of carbon.

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