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I picked up a container of undiluted green antifreeze, and oops, I don't have anything to mix it in! I do have a glass container though at the top of my recycling bin that is about a half gallon. I've heard some plastic containers (soda bottles, plastic milk jugs) can't be used for anti-freeze, but what about glass? Two questions arise from this

  1. As Long as I rinse the previous contents (milk) out, can I safely use this glass container for diluting antifreeze and putting it into my vehicle?

  2. Once I'm done can this go back into the recycle bin, or will trace amounts of antifreeze spoil it for recycling?

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    $\begingroup$ Out of curiosity, what makes you think there'd be a problem in using a glass vessel to handle ethylene glycol? In laboratories we often keep ethylene glycol in glass beakers and retorts without any issues. Even if trace quantities remain after a thorough washing, I doubt that would adversely affect the recycling process ._. $\endgroup$ – paracetamol Dec 8 '16 at 15:56
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    $\begingroup$ @paracresol As a laymen (High school chemistry was a long time ago) I tend to assume everything in my garage is 1.) Poisonous 2.) Corrosive 3.) Literal Bottled Evil. At least until I am told otherwise. And concerning the recycle process - That comes from another automotive fluid (oil) which I have been told by my recycling company not to throw in the recycle bin. $\endgroup$ – Sidney Dec 8 '16 at 16:16
  • $\begingroup$ I'd just rinse the glass container after using with antifreeze and put it back in recycling. I assume that we're really taking about recycling (so that the glass will get remelted) and not returning the bottle to the milk company. // The general notion is that "chemicals" of any sort should not be put into containers that would be used later for foodstuffs. This is an simple dogmatic rule trying to avoid any sort of contamination problems. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Dec 8 '16 at 16:20
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    $\begingroup$ @Sidney Nah it's fine, don't get worked up over it ;P Since Max didn't chew me out for my comment, I guess you can safely go about your garage alchemy. By the way, I liked the "Bottled Evil" bit X'D, Also, you know you can always come over to The Periodic Table (Chat) if you want to discuss anything; guys there are only too glad to help 3:) chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/3229/the-periodic-table $\endgroup$ – paracetamol Dec 8 '16 at 17:01
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  1. As Long as I rinse the previous contents (milk) out, can I safely use this glass container for diluting antifreeze and putting it into my vehicle?

Not sure if you are talking a bout antifreeze for the radiator system or windshield deicers, but both systems are rugged enough that the do not require very pure water to be used. A washed milk container would suffice. The antifreeze wont disrupt the bottle and the bottle wont adulter the antifreeze

  1. Once I'm done can this go back into the recycle bin, or will trace amounts of antifreeze spoil it for recycling?

This somewhat depends on how it will be recycled. If you are putting it in general glass recycling then the bottle will become cullet that will heated to temperatures high enough to burn off any residue and it wont matter.

If you are returning the milk bottle to the producer for reuse then they have to clean them well enough to remove milk reside which is harder to remove than either your antifreeze or the bitterants in antifreeze. Any reputable bottler would expect some amount of non-milk substances in the bottles and clean them sufficiently well to make sure every bottle is clean and safe. Though I would recommended that you do rinse it before furnishing it to them out of courtesy.

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