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I have to learn many methods of preparations of various hydrocarbons and their reactions. For this, I went through many articles and some books but didn't found the details of reactions anywhere (There are details for only some of these) For example, why do we chose Nickel as the catalyst other than anything else to prepare ethane by catalytic hydrogenation of ethene? And why this reaction has to take place at 300°C and not at a lower or greater temperature?

I have 'a lot of hydrocarbons and a lot of methods to prepare them and a lot of their reactions' to learn so I want a book which has been designed especially to cover this topic so it could provide the details I want. Basically my course/syllabus includes Methods of preparation and reactions of methane, ethane, ethene, ethyne, benzene + alkyl-halides, alcohols, phenols, ethers, Aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and Esters.

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For example, why do we chose Nickel as the catalyst other than anything else to prepare ethane by catalytic hydrogenation of ethene?

  • Palladium is expensive ($690~\$\mathrm{US}/\mathrm {oz.tr}; 1~\mathrm{oz.tr = 31.1 g}$).

  • Nickel is cheap ($11~\$\mathrm{US}/\mathrm {kg}$).

Catalytic hydrogenation of ethene is the model reaction performed to understand the mechanism of this type of processes, but I'd be astonished if it had any technical relevance.

  1. There is enough ethane available from the processing of natural gas by distillation (demethanizer, deethanizer).

  2. Ethene is the more interesting starting material for polymerization, oxidation, etc.

And why this reaction has to take place at 300 °C and not at a lower or greater temperature?

Does it really? In earlier mechanistic studies, such as Review of Physical Chemistry of Japan, 1937, 11, 153-165, or Discuss. Faraday Soc., 1950, 8, 152-159, the hydrogenation of ethene on a nickel catalyst was performed at much longer temperatures (-78 to 0 °C).

preparation and reactions of alkyl halides, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and esters

For lab-scale reactions, any decent introductory book on Organic Chemistry will do.

If you're looking for books that focus on experimental procedures (cook books), there are two which I can recommend (Note that have only used the original German versions):

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