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Why do noble gases, although not molecules, use London dispersion forces?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by ringo, getafix, Wildcat, Ivan Neretin, Jan Nov 21 '16 at 12:59

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  1. Noble gases typically do not form molecules as these atoms have filled valence shells rendering them chemically very stable and therefore unreactive. Despite that, there are numerous compounds synthesized using noble gas atoms.

  2. The London dispersion force is a temporary attractive force that results when the electrons in two adjacent atoms occupy positions that make the atoms form temporary dipoles. This force is sometimes called an induced-dipole-induced-dipole attraction. Noble gases are able to liquefy because of this force. For example, Helium liquefies at 4K, without this force, its boiling temperature would be lower or Helium would not liquefy at all.

Have also a look here.

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