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Is it possible to get salt and water (neutralization reaction) by reacting a gas and an acid?

I don't know if it's possible or not. I'm unable to find any examples in this regard.

Would anyone be able to provide an example in support of the question?

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, ammonia is a gas. $\endgroup$ – orthocresol Sep 18 '16 at 14:32
  • $\begingroup$ I know that ammonia(g) and HCl(aq) produce NH4Cl (s) but I cannot find such a reaction that produce salt and water. $\endgroup$ – abhijit Sep 18 '16 at 14:35
  • $\begingroup$ So basically you are looking for a hydroxide that is gaseous... $\endgroup$ – orthocresol Sep 18 '16 at 14:50
  • $\begingroup$ Well this will work .Is there any? $\endgroup$ – abhijit Sep 18 '16 at 15:05
  • $\begingroup$ You can vaporize sodium hydroxide into a gas. $\endgroup$ – Zhe Nov 18 '16 at 2:54
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If you want to get salt, then you should look for a volatile base. $\ce{NH3}$ does our job here.
$$\ce{2NH3 + H2SO4 -> (NH4)2SO4}$$

However, I am not sure if water could be formed. If there exists something like $\ce{NH4OH}$ vapours, then sure, water will be formed.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yeah I also think in this way but I cannot find such reaction to produce salt and water $\endgroup$ – abhijit Sep 18 '16 at 14:37
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English is odd: "a salt" includes $\ce{CaF2}$, $\ce{NH4Cl}$ [as @ortocresol states] and $\ce{NaCl}$ as well as many other compounds. Just "salt", though, implies "table salt", $\ce{NaCl}$. So which do you mean?

Any gas that can react with an acid to produce table salt, $\ce{NaCl}$ must contain sodium, then. $\ce{NaOH}$ has a boiling point of 1,661 K, so bubbling $\ce{NaOH}$ vapor into hydrochloric acid would work. For that matter, Na boils at 1,156 K, so would be easier to do, though it also produces $\ce{H2}$ (as well as water) as a byproduct.

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  • $\begingroup$ Fine remark brother.Well, the word salt has nothing to do with table salt; it may be inorganic or organic .In chemistry lab we utter the word salt several times for different purposes.Then your remark construe that every time we ask for table salt!! I think it is unimportant to explain what it is;context clearly interprets it. $\endgroup$ – abhijit Sep 19 '16 at 19:47
  • $\begingroup$ Still if you have any confusion go onto the link please "en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_(chemistry)". $\endgroup$ – abhijit Sep 19 '16 at 19:49

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