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Gold and Chromium have weird electron configurations, because electrons are differently divided : eg an electron jumps from a s-orbital to a d-orbital to have a half-filled s orbital and a fully/half filled d-orbital, which is much more stable. But does this also occur with the p-orbitals? eg why does Fluorine not transfer an electron from its s orbital to its p orbital to have a half-filled s orbital and a fully filled p-orbital, that would be more stable?

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The simplest answer to this problem is related to relative energy differences between the Nd and (N+1)s orbitals in transition metals and Ns and Np orbitals. The Nd orbitals in transition metals are at a slightly lower energy than the (N+1)s orbitals, so for certain atoms there are some unusual changes in the electron configurations, e.g. Cr and Cu. However, the energy differences between the Ns and Np orbitals are quite large, with Np being higher in energy. In these cases, there is a substantial energetic penalty in moving an electron from the Ns to Np orbital.

The electron configuration problem for transition metals is complex, but this J Chem Ed article has a nice description of the theory, although it is somewhat technical.

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