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Solving past questions preparing for a test, I am stuck at number 11. Is multiplicity the ml valueenter image description here

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closed as off-topic by Ivan Neretin, Wildcat, Todd Minehardt, Loong, pH13 - Yet another Philipp Sep 13 '16 at 18:09

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$m_l$ is the magnetic quantum number, and multiplicity refers to the number of allowed values that $m_l$ can be.

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  • $\begingroup$ I found strange the text "in a magnetic field". $\endgroup$ – user1420303 Sep 13 '16 at 15:24
  • $\begingroup$ @user1420303 Why? In an atom, an applied electric field will only shift the energy levels, not split them. You need an applied magnetic field to do that. $\endgroup$ – pentavalentcarbon Sep 13 '16 at 15:51
  • $\begingroup$ I agree with your answer. But the number of allowed values for $m_l$ (for some $l$) is 2$l$+1 when no magnetic field is applied. As the typical hydrogen atom case. In presence of an external magnetic field there would be further lost of degeneracy. That is why I do not get why to state "in a magnetic field" in 11. I would not say that there is not split of energy levels in presence of an electric field (for example, crystal field theory). $\endgroup$ – user1420303 Sep 13 '16 at 16:01
  • $\begingroup$ I was overthinking it; just because the energy does or doesn't change has no affect on the allowed values. I was also only thinking of the electric dipole approximation between p orbitals. But yes, it is more general than "in a magnetic field". $\endgroup$ – pentavalentcarbon Sep 13 '16 at 16:33

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