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What are the basic differences between inhibitors and poisons which are used in a reaction Actually both the names confuse me so please help me out.

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    $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… $\endgroup$ – JM97 Aug 31 '16 at 11:18
  • $\begingroup$ Inhibition is reversible, poisoning is not. $\endgroup$ – Jan Aug 31 '16 at 11:39
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My understanding of catalyst poisons and inhibitors is that:

  1. Inhibitors curb the catalyzing powers of a catalyst but do not react with any of the reactants and the reaction is reversible.

  2. Poisons react with the catalyst and/or the reactants and the reaction is irreversible.

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  • $\begingroup$ I disagree. There are too many articles about "reversible catalyst poisoning" for an answer to be so clear cut. $\endgroup$ – SteffX Aug 31 '16 at 18:44
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    $\begingroup$ Couldn't the difference be that poisons react with the catalyst, possibly reversible to inhibit the reaction, and inhibitors just inhibit the reaction by doing something without reacting with the catalyst, like changing the pH, scavenging radicals or just binding in a non-covalent manner? $\endgroup$ – VonBeche Aug 31 '16 at 21:32
  • $\begingroup$ @SteffX, I would say that the phrase "reversible catalyst poisoning" implies that catalyst poisoning is not supposed to be reversible, so the initial definition kinda stands, but is being pushed by current advances, and maybe will change in the near future? $\endgroup$ – SCH Sep 1 '16 at 12:50

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