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This maybe a really simple question, but I've been trying to find the answer and it's getting kind of hard.

Is molar mass a physical or chemical property?

My teacher says it's a chemical one, but I don't think it matches the definition for chemical properties (there's a chemical reaction or a change in the composition of the substance).

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Molar mass is the mass of the chemical substance per unit mole. Or in other words, mass of one mole of a substance expressed in grams/mole is molar mass. It's the mass of 6.023x 10^23 unit particles(atoms/compounds/ions) in a chemical substance.

As it's at molar level, I don't think there's any direct way of measuring it. So, it may account as a chemical property.

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Molar mass is simply the atomic mass expressed in grams/mol numerically,and atomic mass is actually a comparison of the mass of an element with c-12 isotope,we are not measuring it here but are comparing it with another element and to be a physical quantity a parameter needs to be measurable.Now imagine that atomic mass is a comparison and if you take a mole of the mass of a substance we are taking a collection of a lot of atomic masses which is not a physical quantity.therefore molar mass should also be a chemical quantity.i guess you should also refer to your teacher who would explain it to you in detail but i hope this should help you.:>

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