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What is the significance of using cupric oxide in the quantitative analysis of carbon?

As far as I can tell from my research, only $\ce{CuO}$ is used to oxidize carbon to $\ce{CO2}$. Why can't we use other oxidants like $\ce{HNO3}$ or other metal oxides such as hematite? Is the use of $\ce{CuO}$ prevalent because of low cost or does it has some other special property?

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  • $\begingroup$ "The quantitative analysis of carbon" is done using many different procedures. Exactly what type of sample and what procedure are you interested in? $\endgroup$ – MaxW Aug 12 '16 at 15:05
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    $\begingroup$ @MaxW But many sites and my textbook mention only one compound CuO for estimating the presence of carbon in an organic compound, so out of curiosity I asked this question . Could you please refer any book or website where oxidant is other than CuO? A particular sample is not mentioned and it is given in general. $\endgroup$ – JM97 Aug 12 '16 at 15:11
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    $\begingroup$ For example it is common to analyze for carbon in steels and rocks. You won't use the same procedure for analyzing rocks that you use for steels. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Aug 12 '16 at 16:55
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You got the crux of it: low cost. And it works, regardless of what the starting compound was. And it's not just low cost to purchase, it is easy to regenerate the used cupric oxide multiple times by heating it under oxygen.

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