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How are large quantities of the substances we use in the lab generally produced? (As in the process from getting the stuff out of the ground to use in the lab) How 'pure' are they? Also: is it possible to create relatively pure substances with household goods?

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closed as too broad by Mithoron, Todd Minehardt, andselisk, Tyberius, airhuff Oct 3 '17 at 4:28

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ This is really more of a Physics question - chemistry is what we do to it afterwards. $\endgroup$ – medivh Jul 3 '13 at 11:03
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    $\begingroup$ @medivh Perhaps more so engineering than physics. The OP needs to be a bit more specific: are we talking petroleum based products? Organics? Metal salts? And regarding household goods one can be more specific as well; what household goods do you have in mind and what would be the purpose of doing so? $\endgroup$ – bobthechemist Jul 3 '13 at 17:58
  • $\begingroup$ @medivh I strongly disagree. Chemical synthesis is certainly a major subfield of chemistry and on topic here. The problem is that this question is impossibly broad. $\endgroup$ – airhuff Oct 3 '17 at 4:28
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No lab reagent is 100% pure. But you can get really close to that.

How 'pure' are they?

Read the label or do the analysis. It varies A LOT from one reagent to another.

Is it possible to create relatively pure substances with household goods?

Depends on the substance, depends how pure you want it. For instance, you can very easily distill water at home, but pure water is hard to get.

How are large quantities of the substances we use in the lab generally produced? (As in the process from getting the stuff out of the ground to use in the lab)

You'll need to be more specific. There are entire classes you can take at the uni on the large scale production and purification methods of this and that type of reagents. I see you used the ionic-compounds tag, but that's far from specific. A more answerable question would be "How are compounds X and Y produced and purified?"

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How are large quantities of the substances we use in the lab generally produced?

This is answered reasonable well on Wikipedia

Also: is it possible to create relatively pure substances with household goods?

Depends. Recrystallization can be performed at kitchen, so some substances can be purified at home. However, it is easier to buy pure substance in most cases.

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