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Why is it that whenever hydrogen gas is produced in a reaction, it comes out in the form of tiny bubbles, but whenever Carbon dioxide is produced it comes out in the form of a brisk effervescence like lather?

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  • $\begingroup$ Biological, thermal, electrolytic, or simple chemical reactions can all produce these gasses. Can you specify which reactions? $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 12, 2016 at 19:31

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Likely, any difference you've observed is due to the high solubility of $\ce{CO2}$ in water... it allows accumulation of enough dissolved gas to nucleate and form large bubbles, as in seltzer. BTW, $\ce{Na}$ or $\ce{K}$ etc. do not make tiny bubbles when put in water.

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