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While I was doing an Electrolysis experiment with stain less Anode/Cathodes on aluminium plate, Orange dust started floating on top of the water solution.

What is this chemical's name and is it toxic or not?

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    $\begingroup$ You realize that your description of the experimental setup is a bit scanty, right? $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Jul 4 '16 at 14:59
  • $\begingroup$ @IvanNeretin I'm guessing he/she only wants to know what the Chemical inside the solution is. $\endgroup$ – DraggyWolf Jul 4 '16 at 15:21
  • $\begingroup$ @DraggyWolf I mean electrolize on aluminium plaet with stain less rods $\endgroup$ – Catschooter Jul 4 '16 at 16:37
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Could be a chromate or dichromate, which is very likely to be rather toxic. These compounds tend to have yellow and orange colors. Stainless steel is an alloy of iron and chromium, the latter of which can could cause this.

I would recommend NOT using stainless steel electrodes, and find a way to safely dispose of the mixture.

Here is a link which might help explain why this is not a great idea.

However, it might also be possible that the chemical you are electrolysis is causing this. What is in the solution?

Assuming that it is producing chromates, you might be able to stop this by turning down the voltage.

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  • $\begingroup$ This answer assumes that the "stain less" you refer to is actually stainless steel, and I assume that English is not your first language. $\endgroup$ – ChemBird Jul 4 '16 at 21:37

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