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This question already has an answer here:

I am trying to understand hybridisation. In methane carbon has $\mathrm{sp^3}$ hybridisation, but what is the hybridisation of hydrogen? Is it $\mathrm{sp^3}$? If yes then why?

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marked as duplicate by Todd Minehardt, Jan, Klaus-Dieter Warzecha, M.A.R., ringo Nov 24 '16 at 6:14

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    $\begingroup$ What orbitals does hydrogen have available for bonding? $\endgroup$ – bon Jun 26 '16 at 9:27
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    $\begingroup$ Orbitals of hydrogen atoms aren't hybridised in $\ce{CH4}$ at all: 1$\mathrm{s}$ orbital of each hydrogen atom forms a $\sigma$-bond with one of the four $\mathrm{sp^3}$-hybridised orbitals of the carbon atom. $\endgroup$ – Wildcat Jun 26 '16 at 9:28
  • $\begingroup$ Also, per calculations and experimental data, you could also argue for an unhybridised carbon since there are two different energies of the binding MOs. $\endgroup$ – Jan Jun 26 '16 at 16:56
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    $\begingroup$ You should answer your own question so that it may be useful to future users. $\endgroup$ – bon Jul 12 '16 at 10:21
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Hydrogen does not hybridise, as it only has one $s$ orbital. Hybridisation is the "mixing of $s$ and $p$ orbitals; here is a good explanation (for ethane, but it explains the general theory as well).

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    $\begingroup$ Nitpicking. One filled s orbital $\endgroup$ – orthocresol Sep 20 '16 at 16:45
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it is always possible to find the hybridization of the central atom i.e., Carbon. The atomic orbital of hydrogen does not undergo hybridization.

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