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Assuming every other conditions are the same, what would be the comparison of energy required to break single bond, double bond and triple bond of a carbon atom in an organic molecule?

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365 kJ/mol for the single bond, 598 kJ/mol for the double bond, and 813 kJ/mol for the triple bond. These are usually listed as bond enthalpy or heat of formation in scientific table books. If you don't find the one you need you can calculate it in steps according to Hess' Law.

If you want the energy required to break one bond as opposed to a mol of bonds, you divide the number I gave by Avogadro's number, which is the number of atoms or molecules in a mol of a compund or element.

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    $\begingroup$ noting that these are "suggested values" for bonds that "some people" "typically" ascribe to being "single", "double", "triple." (Basically, there is some subjectivity in divisions due to bond energy) $\endgroup$ – Eric Brown Jun 21 '13 at 17:27
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Let it be organic or inorganic compound More the no. of bonds between 2 atoms more the energy required to break it.

This is because intermolecular force of attraction increases as the no. of bonds increase. So to break the bonds one needs more energy or so called more bond enthalpy.

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