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I've seen some phase diagrams and I found really interesting, how many exotic solid phases of most elements exist on higher pressure and temperature.

But I've seen always only a single liquid phase and also only a single gaseous phase.

The second is understable, but the first not. I think, if there is an unconventional potential energy field between the molecules, maybe it is not impossible.

Does any chemical compounds with multiple liquid phases exist?

If not, why not?


Extension: Well, superfluid helium is one of them. Maybe I don't formulate enough well, but I think on a distinct phase border, like between ice-I and water. As I know, the superfluid helium is a mix of its superfluid and normal fluid phases.

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    $\begingroup$ Well, superfluid Helium is one of them. Maybe I don't formulate enough well, but I think on a distinct phase border, like between ice-I and water. As I know, the superfluid Helium is a mix of its superfluid and normal fluid phases. $\endgroup$ – peterh says reinstate Monica May 23 '16 at 3:25
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    $\begingroup$ related chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/49510/… $\endgroup$ – orthocresol May 23 '16 at 9:27
  • $\begingroup$ I suspect helium may be the only one. At sufficiently low temperatures, superfluid $\ce{^3 He}$ phase separates from $\ce{^4 He}$, producing two distinct superfluid phases, presumably with an almost invisble meniscus between them. Not sure whether this satisfies your requirements. $\endgroup$ – Nicolau Saker Neto May 23 '16 at 11:46
  • $\begingroup$ @NicolauSakerNeto Both of He3 and He4 can be superfluid. $\endgroup$ – peterh says reinstate Monica May 23 '16 at 13:33
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There's no reason why chemical substances with multiple liquid phases shouldn't exist.

In fact there is evidence for the existence of a least a second form of (surprise) liquid water. If you search the Web for liquid-liquid phase transitions you will find more of these, e.g. cerium.

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