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If 18g of ice at a temperature of -6 ℃ is placed in 250 g of water at 20 ℃, we know that there is enough energy supplied by the water to completely melt the ice and transform it into liquid. My question is: during the phase change of the ice, when the temperature of the ice has reached 0 ℃, is mass from the ice transferred to the surrounding water? In other words, is the mass of the ice changing during phase change or is it constant? By the mass of ice, I mean mass that is still solid.

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    $\begingroup$ Have you ever actually seen a piece of ice, and how it melts? $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin May 22 '16 at 18:28
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When the temperature of the ice has reached 0°C, additional heat transferred from the liquid water to the ice will not increase the temperature of the ice above 0°C. Instead the transferred heat is consumed as heat of fusion. This lets ice melt, which means that there is a phase change from solid to liquid, which means that a certain mass of the ice is transferred to the liquid water. The mass of the ice consequently decreases during the phase change.

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    $\begingroup$ Thank you for your answer. My source of confusion was the fact that ice and water can co-exist at 0 ℃. $\endgroup$ – Yasmen Quandil May 22 '16 at 18:49

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