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Normally when you do electrolysis, you would use a glass container. Would it be wise to use a acrylic container? I have one spare but not sure if this would affect the electrolysis process. Is there any reaction between the acrylic container in the electrolysis process?

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  • $\begingroup$ Are you performing an electrolysis of water? $\endgroup$ – M.A.R. Apr 27 '16 at 18:01
  • $\begingroup$ yes. doing with other liquid probably is dangerous. $\endgroup$ – LeviJames Apr 27 '16 at 23:51
  • $\begingroup$ Is my question still on hold? $\endgroup$ – LeviJames Apr 27 '16 at 23:52
  • $\begingroup$ It isn't now. ;) $\endgroup$ – M.A.R. Apr 28 '16 at 6:37
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Poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA withstands acids and bases of low concentration. So it should be safe for electrolysis of water.

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I would be very cautious with what to electrolyse in an acrylic container. Anything too basic or too acidic will not do any good, neither aggressive oxidizers. This rules out any chlorides for example and anything with metals deposition (as it would leave acidic solution). Sulfates should be fine, though, and hydrocarbons probably too.

I would look at polyethylene and/or polypropylene container if glass is unavailable. These materials are more durable - they withstand most acids and bases in water with no problems and few oxidizers in water can seriously affect them (though chlorine and bromine potentially can - but not right away, it would take some time)

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