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How could a nuclear reaction possibly happen at room temperature? We know how other blasts work and what chemicals are used to cause their effect, but what chemicals could cause a nuclear reaction at room temperature or containable? It sounds like it would be the opposite of what causes them to go boom!

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Chemistry.SE! Take the tour to get familiar with this site. Mathematical expressions and equations can be formatted using $\LaTeX$ syntax. I don't understand your question. There is currently no acceptable model that would allow cold fusion to happen. See also wikipedia. Also this question seems not to be about chemistry and is likely to be closed. $\endgroup$ – Martin - マーチン Apr 8 '16 at 5:36
  • $\begingroup$ Cold fusion has been debunked. $\endgroup$ – MaxW Apr 8 '16 at 7:45
  • $\begingroup$ A nuclear reaction (alpha decay, for instance) can perfectly well happen at room temperature, as well as at any other. But if you are specifically interested in fusion, it can't, and no chemicals can help. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Apr 8 '16 at 9:05
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    $\begingroup$ There is a rigorously proven way to achieve measurable fusion of atomic nuclei at room temperature and pressure: muon-catalyzed fusion. Unfortunately the details of our Universe are such that this cannot be used to obtain virtually limitless energy. Oh well. $\endgroup$ – Nicolau Saker Neto Apr 8 '16 at 9:36
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    $\begingroup$ With an accelerator, one can certainly generate fusion or other nuclear reactions in atoms at room temperature. Of course, that is kind of cheating, since you are sending in (mono)energetic particles, but they are not a thermal distribution. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Apr 8 '16 at 15:38
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No chemical reaction can have any significant influence on the rate of nuclear reactions. The valence electrons have such a low probability of being actually in the atomic nuceus (zero for p orbitals, and virtually zero for s,.. orbitals, because the core is so small) that no interaction is observed. It a different story for inner electrons of heavy elements, but those are not much influenced by chemistry.

I'm not sure if a tiny variation of the half life of certain decays is measurable for different chemical states. But to really change something, let alone cause a fusion reaction, is totally impossible.

(Update: The website reference by Ian below gives biggest changes of halflife of less than one percent for Be-7, and less for a few other cases. As could be expected, electron capture decays are most sensitive. Removing inner electrons of heavy elements can make huge changes.)

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