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I cant discern these two terminologies. Would someone be very kind to help me on it?

I think hydroxide mean M(OH)x where M is a metal ion, while oxyhydroxide means something like MO(OH). Is that right? Oxyhydroxide equals to oxide-hydroxide.

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  • $\begingroup$ You may see this:-chemistry.stackexchange.com/questions/44159/… $\endgroup$ – Nilay Ghosh Mar 22 '16 at 10:06
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! Then I have a further question, is the OH in oxyhydroxide anion or it is charge balance like the OH in organics? I ask this because in the Chinese nomenclature of NiO(OH), they tend to the second one which means that the OH and NiO(I think it is the Ni in NiO) are bonding together by covalent bond. $\endgroup$ – Wu Jeremy Mar 23 '16 at 1:48
  • $\begingroup$ In both the cases, the -OH group is covalently bonded to manganese. So, I think in case of nickel also the -OH group is covalently bonded. I am not too sure about it but don't worry. I will search about it and tell you the answer. $\endgroup$ – Nilay Ghosh Mar 23 '16 at 3:57
  • $\begingroup$ Actually NiOOH follow a solid state chemistry. In page 3 of this link, it says that NiOOH has various type of forms like beta-, gamma- etc. Here, the nickel oxide layer is stacked one above the other to form a lattice. But conventionally, NiOOH should be said nickel (III )oxyhydroxide. $\endgroup$ – Nilay Ghosh Mar 23 '16 at 4:07
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Yes, you have correct idea.

Oxyhydroxide is any mixed oxide and hydroxide. For example Iron(III) oxide-hydroxide

While in hydroxide hydrogen and oxygen atom are joined with covent cond.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks Freddy! Then I have a further question, is the OH in oxyhydroxide anion or it is charge balance like the OH in organics? I ask this because in the Chinese nomenclature of NiO(OH), they tend to the second one which means that the OH and NiO(I think it is the Ni in NiO) are bonding together by covalent bond. $\endgroup$ – Wu Jeremy Mar 22 '16 at 9:01

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