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I understand Enthalpy, the exchange of energy between products and reactants. But what is Gibbs Free Energy and Entropy? I know that Gibbs free Energy is the difference between the change in Enthalpy - [(the change in entropy)*the Temperature]. However I am not able to understand the physical meaning. What does this really mean? On the molecular scale where is it stored? If you can make it less abstract than it is right now, that would help a lot.

I am assuming once I understand Entropy, I should be able to understand Gibbs Free Energy. So, my question on Entropy is, where is entropy stored? I know it is the total disorder in the ENTIRE system, not just one molecule, the units for Entropy are J/K, and by disorder I mean the preference of the system to go to a chaotic/disordered state.

So, when solving for Gibbs Free Energy, what are we finally getting by subtracting the energy from the system (dS) from the reactions exchange in energy (dH).

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Like you said Gibbs free energy is the enthalpy minus TdS so basically it's the energy available (free energy) after you take the thermal energy out of the system. The TdS term is the energy due to random thermal fluctuations so sometimes it's more useful to remove that from the enthalpy and deal with the free energy especially when trying to determine spontaneity of reaction.

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Entropy is a measure of randomness in the molecules in a compound.When randomness increases entropy increases.

This randomness consumes some energy of the compound because energy is required to maintain its randomness.This is represented by TΔS.This energy cannot be used for useful purposes.Thus the total energy which can be obtained from a compound is the total energy( ΔH) minus the TΔS term.This maximum useful energy which can be obtained from a compound is called Gibbs Free Energy (ΔG = ΔH-TΔS).

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