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If carbon atom is tetravalent while oxygen atom is divalent so when they combine together the result should be $\ce{C2O4}$ then how are there compounds of formulas with $\ce{CO2}$, $\ce{CO3}$ and others? How do they bond?

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    $\begingroup$ $\ce{CO2}$ is not a radical. $\endgroup$ – bon Feb 26 '16 at 10:14
  • $\begingroup$ Yes sorry i got confused .. but i want to ask about their formation regarding valencies $\endgroup$ – user27247 Feb 26 '16 at 10:18
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    $\begingroup$ Could you please tell me first what you would consider the definition of a radical? $\endgroup$ – M.A.R. Feb 26 '16 at 10:19
  • $\begingroup$ Group of atoms that act like one atom during the chemical reaction .. ? I don't know much, i am asking so may someone correct my information about radicals $\endgroup$ – user27247 Feb 26 '16 at 10:29
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This is the lewis structure of $\ce{CO_2}$.Each bond symbolises of sharing of two electrons.One from oxygen and other from carbon.

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You can imagine $\ce{CO_2}$ as such.

Your confusion

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Are you thinking something like this should be happening?enter image description here

Formation of $\ce{CO_2}$ can be calculted by transfer of valencies but cannot be explained. And there are other compounds which cannot be calculated by valency transfer but can be explained by Kossell-Lewis approach.

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Transfer of valencies only calculate and predict the formation of a compound.It does not explain.

$\ce{CO_2}$ is not a radical

In chemistry, a radical (more precisely, a free radical) is an atom, molecule, or ion that has unpaired valence electrons. Like this.

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