-1
$\begingroup$

The specific gravity of PTFE teflon is roughly 2.3. I have a 3/8" diameter sphere made up of entirely PTFE teflon, and I would like for it to float to the surface when dropped into a liquid.

Does anyone know of a liquid, other than mercury, that will allow this feat to be achievable?

(I prefer that the liquid be both non-toxic and inexpensive)

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Gallium as well, presumably. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Feb 10 '16 at 15:56
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clerici_solution - unfortunately toxic and expensive. That aside, I know that caesium chloride is used for centrifugation purposes although I'm not sure what's the highest density it can reach (lazy to calculate it right now). $\endgroup$ – orthocresol Feb 10 '16 at 16:08
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Tetrabromomethane - Density: 3.42 g/cm³ $\endgroup$ – MaxW Feb 10 '16 at 16:41
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ $\ce{CHBr3}$ or $\ce{CH2I2}$ would do as well. $\endgroup$ – Ivan Neretin Feb 10 '16 at 16:47
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think cesium chloride is quite dense enough (in aqeeous solution). Cesium bromide might do the trick. $\endgroup$ – Curt F. Jun 25 '16 at 4:36
2
$\begingroup$

Various liquids are denser than $2.2\rm~\frac{g}{cm^3}$. $\ce{CBr2F2}$ is one of them with fairly low toxicity. Check out halons.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.