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For a science/engineering project we are taking pool water (disinfected), filtering to 0.1 microns, and pumping to the kitchen. Of course there is still 5 ppm of chlorine present so we want to neutralize the chlorine. Asorbic acid in the form of orange juice neutralized the chlorine, but I understand that it also creates some amount of HCl. This method is used to neutralize chlorine in water being introduced into ponds, rivers, etc. so that the chlorine does not kill the fish.

Could the asorbic acid actually create enough HCl to be dangerous, how can I test this, and what is acceptable? I used a standard pool testing kit to test the chlorine.

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pH of lemon juice and cola is around 2-3. As long as you don't go below this point, drinking should be fine.

It is different if you consider fish living in such water. pH from several ppm would not drop below 5, which is close to rainwater, but significantly lower than normal river or sea water (6-7 and 7-8 respectively). You should consult specialized literature in the case.

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HCl is completely dissociated in aqueous solutions, so the protons and chloride ions are independent from each other.

As long as the acidity (pH value) of the water is acceptable you should be fine (note that sea water contains about 20000 ppm chloride).

If the fish is sensible to chloride you should also take into account that the water has a higher chloride concentration than the water originally used to fill the pool. So you might want to measure chlorine, too.

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  • $\begingroup$ HCl is completely dissociated in aqueous solutions, so the protons and chloride ions are independent from each other. What exactly do you mean by this? The concentrations are obviously not independent because they must be equal. $\endgroup$ – bon Feb 7 '16 at 22:30
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    $\begingroup$ No, they must not be the same as long as other ions are present which is certainly true for pool water. To determine if the acid is hazardous to fish it should be sufficient to measure the pH. I've added a remark about higher chloride concentration. $\endgroup$ – aventurin Feb 7 '16 at 23:09

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