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1 mol of $\ce{F2}$ is turned into $\ce{2F}$ (atoms).

Is this the specific enthalpy of atomization, or two times that?

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ChemGuide says that 'The standard atomisation enthalpy is the enthalpy change when 1 mole of gaseous atoms is formed from the element in its standard state.'

For example, \begin{array}{rc} \ce{1/2 Cl2 (g) -> Cl (g)} & \Delta H_{a}^{0} = +122~\mathrm{kJ/mol} \\ \ce{1/2 Br2 (l) -> Br (g)} & \Delta H_{a}^{0} = +112~\mathrm{kJ/mol} \\ \ce{Na (s) -> Na (g)} & \Delta H_{a}^{0} = +107~\mathrm{kJ/mol} \end{array}

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Enthalpy of atomisation is energy required to break 1 mole of E-E bonds.

Eg: $\ce{1 F2 -> 2 F}$ .............................$\Delta H_{atomisation}$

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